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About Nobel Prize
    The Nobel Prize is an international award given yearly since 1901 for achievements in physics, chemistry, medicine, literature and for peace. In 1968, the Bank of Sweden instituted the Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, founder of the Nobel Prize.

    The Prize Winners are announced in October every year. They receive their awards (a prize amount, a gold medal and a diploma) on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death.
    Alfred Nobel was born in 1833 in Stockholm, Sweden. His family was descended from Olof Rudbeck, the best-known technical genius of Sweden's 17th century era as a great power in northern Europe.

    Nobel invented dynamite in 1866 and later built up companies and laboratories in more than 20 countries all over the world.

    On November 27, 1895, Nobel signed his last will providing for the establishment of the Nobel Prize. He died of cerebral haemorrhage in his home in San Remo, Italy on December 10, 1896.
    Alfred died in San Remo, Italy on December 10, 1896. In his last will and testament, he wrote that much of his fortune was to be used to give prizes to those who have done their best for humanity in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature and peace.

    In 1901, the first Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine and Literature were first awarded in Stockholm, Sweden and the Peace Prize in Kristiania (now Oslo), Norway.
    The first Prize Award Ceremony in 1901 at the Old Royal Academy of Music in Stockholm.
 
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Join hands, save world

A senior State leader yesterday called on the international community to join hands in addressing the global problems of energy and the environment.

Vice-Premier Zeng Peiyan suggested the establishment of a technology-transfer mechanism to enhance capabilities in maintaining energy security and providing better environmental protection for developing countries.

"(We hope) to set up bilateral or multilateral mechanisms to increase exchange and communications and to cooperate in dealing with severe problems and emergencies in the fields of energy and the environment," Zeng said at the opening ceremony of the Nobel Laureates Beijing Forum, which was attended by nine Nobel Prize winners and a further six leading scientists.

He said despite fast economic growth over the past decade, the country has paid a huge price in terms of resources and the environment.

He said this year the country would post double-digit economic growth figures for the fifth consecutive year.

He said the country, which is still in the middle of a rapid industrialization and urbanization process, is increasing its demand for energy resources.

"Ever-increasing investment, huge energy consumption and heavier discharges of pollutant all pose grave threats to the sustainable development of the economy and society," he said.

Zeng said the country should optimize its energy supply structure by developing more clean energy resources like nuclear, solar, wind and water power, and bio-fuels.

"Energy conservation and pollutants reduction are the best ways for us to adjust the economic structure and growth mode," he said, adding the country has set the goal to reduce energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20 percent and the discharge of major pollutants like sulfur dioxide by 10 percent.

With 70 percent of its power supply based on coal burning, China is facing mounting pressure from the international community, as it is set to replace the US as the top emitter of greenhouse gases.

"Beijing authorities are very aware of the problem and are putting in place a quite remarkable series of measures," Kurt Lambeck, professor of geophysics at the Australian National University, said at the meeting.

"The government is seriously committed to solving the problem," he said.

As for technological support from developed countries, Lambeck said: "I think it is in our own interest to provide it.

"If China cannot curb its greenhouse gas emissions, it will affect not only them but the world as a whole."

    

    
china daily